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Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority

Carolinian Zone

The Carolinian zone in Canada is very small compared to other vegetation zones, making up only one per cent of the total land area of Canada, but it has more flora and fauna species than any other ecosystem in Canada.

More than 2,200 species of herbaceous plants are found here, including 64 species of ferns, at least 110 species of grasses, and more than 130 different sedge species. There are 70 species of trees alone.

For more information visit: www.carolinian.org

First major book about Carolinian Canada published

Carolinian CanadaThe first major book about Carolinian Canada has now been published. Sweeping from Toronto to Lake Huron and Lake Erie is a region of biological richness unmatched in Canada. Here the native trees have unusual names  Sassafras, Cucumber Magnolia, Tulip-tree, Black Walnut, Pawpaw - evoking the distinctly southern character for which the region is named. The Carolinian region is only a quarter of a per cent of the country's total land area, but close to one-third of Canada's rare and endangered plants and animals live here. So does more than a quarter of the country's population. The Carolinian landscape is one of the most threatened in North America. Since 1984 the Carolinian Canada Coalition (CCC) has been bringing together organizations, communities, and individuals to conserve the special places and species of the Carolinian life zone. Read more about a new book: The Natural Treasures of Carolinian Canada; Discovering the Rich Natural Diversity of Ontario's Southwestern Heartland; By the Carolinian Canada Coalition; Edited by Lorraine Johnson.

For more information visit Carolinian Canada webpage.

 

First major book about Carolinian Canada published

The first major book about Carolinian Canada has now been published. Sweeping from Toronto to Lake Huron and Lake Erie is a region of biological richness unmatched in Canada. Here the native trees have unusual names Sassafras, Cucumber Magnolia, Tulip-tree, Black Walnut, Pawpaw - evoking the distinctly southern character for which the region is named. The Carolinian region is only a quarter of a per cent of the country's total land area, but close to one-third of Canada's rare and endangered plants and animals live here. So does more than a quarter of the country's population. The Carolinian landscape is one of the most threatened in North America. Since 1984 the Carolinian Canada Coalition (CCC) has been bringing together organizations, communities, and individuals to conserve the special places and species of the Carolinian life zone. Read more about a new book: The Natural Treasures of Carolinian Canada; Discovering the Rich Natural Diversity of Ontario's Southwestern Heartland; By the Carolinian Canada Coalition; Edited by Lorraine Johnson. For more information visit Carolinian Canada webpage.